Storey staffers share July garden scenes.

Usually I write a little introduction to our monthly bloom day posts, pointing out what’s notable about the weather or my collegues’ photos. But yesterday, editor and frequent Bloom Day post contributor Lisa Hiley sent the following adaptation of “My Favorite Things” along, completely of her own accord. So, while I could go on about our profusion of lilies and the lack of rains, I think Lisa’s lyrical stylings say “July” best. What’s blooming where you are? — Emily Spiegelman, Digital Features Editor

A Few of My Favorite Gardening Things (with apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein, and Julie Andrews, too)

Lyrics adapted by Lisa Hiley

Raindrops on roses
And well-sharpened pruners;
Gloves made of nitrile
And lovely late bloomers;
Robins and sparrows and others with wings —
These are my favorite gardening things.

Cream colored peonies
And jewel tones of chard;
Shovels and trowels
And mulch by the yard;
Arranging cut flowers with color that sings —
These are my favorite gardening things.

My big garden wagon that’s easy to pull,
Forty-pound feed sacks that hold lots of clippings,
Warm sunny summers that come after springs;
These are my favorite gardening things.

When the yard calls,
When the weeds grow,
When everything gets too big,
I simply collect all my favorite things
And then I begin to dig!

Deanna Cook, Charlemont, Massachusetts

Queen Anne’s Lace

Queen Anne’s Lace

Wild rose

Wild rose

Ilona Sherratt, Cheshire, Massachusetts

volunteer sunflower

Volunteer sunflower!

A bouquet of summer blooms

A bouquet of summer blooms

Ash Austin, North Adams, Massachusetts

Day lily

Daylily

Daylily

Daylily

Heather Tietgens, Stamford, Vermont

Coreopsis

Coreopsis

primrose

Primrose

Spirea

Spirea

yellow lily

Yellow lily

Corey Cusson, Charlemont, Massachusetts

Borage

Borage

Cosmos

Cosmos

Pumpkin flower

Pumpkin flower

Sarah Armour, Duxbury, Massachusetts

daylilies

Daylilies galore

Michal Lumsden, Plainfield, Massachusetts

Asiatic Lily

Last fall I planted an Asiatic lily mix in my garden, so this is the first year I’ve seen these bold blood-orange blooms. So beautiful!

daylilies

We have a big stand of the common orange daylilies that you see everywhere this time of year, but these deep maroon and yellow daylilies are my favorite. They’re right next to our front door, offering a warm welcome every time I come home.

Turk’s cap lilies

After living in our house for five years, we just discovered these Turk’s cap lilies in a shady, brushy corner of our yard. I love the spots!

Bee with foxglove


I heard bees buzzing around while I was taking pictures, so I stopped to watch and snapped this guy just as he was heading into a foxglove blossom.

Lavender flowers

The lavender in my herb garden was slow to come back this spring, but the wait was so worth it.

Zoë Spring, Worthington, Massachusetts

Daylily

Daylily

Hydrangea

Hydrangea

Rose

Rose

Andrea Herbst, Bennington, Vermont & New York City, New York

Purple clematis

Purple clematis

Eliza and Alexander Hamilton burial plot

Eliza Hamilton’s grave (next to Alexander’s) is the only plot in Trinity Church that is SWIMMING in flowers and it’s rather lovely.

Carolyn Eckert, Florence, Massachusetts

Bee aalm

Bee balm punk

Bee balm hot summer night

Hot summer night

Gwen Steege, Williamstown, Massachusetts

Daylily

Daylily

Hydrangea and clematis

Hydrangea and clematis

Roses

Roses

David Morrison, Lenox Dale, Massachusetts

potted blooms

Potted blooms

Debbie Surdam, Hoosick, New York

Geranium and vinca vine

Geranium and vinca vine

Hostas in bloom

Roses

Storey Digital Editors

We are the staff at Storey Publishing — the crafters, cooks, brewers, builders, homesteaders, gardeners, and all-around DIY-ers who make Storey books.

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